Athletics News hawkeyesports.com
NCAA: UI Sets New Records for Graduation Rates

Lisa Bluder's Iowa women's basketball team scored a perfect 100 on the GSR for the third straight year.

Lisa Bluder's Iowa women's basketball team scored a perfect 100 on the GSR for the third straight year.

Oct. 25, 2012

IOWA CITY, Iowa - University of Iowa student-athletes have set new records for academic achievement according to data released Thursday by the NCAA as part of its annual report on the work in the classroom by student-athletes across the country.


Student-athletes that entered the University of Iowa in the fall of 2005 graduated at a rate of 77 percent, according to the NCAA. That mark - which uses the federal government benchmark for graduation success -- is three points better than a year ago when Iowa tied the former school record of 74 percent set first in 1994-95. It is also six points better than the UI student body and 12 points better than that achieved all by student-athletes nationally.

The UI also set a new record by posting a score of 87 percent in the NCAA's "Graduation Success Rate" or GSR, one point better than what was posted in 86. It marked the seventh time in the eight years of the GSR's existence that Iowa's student-athletes scored 80 percent or better.





"I'm very proud of the work of not only our student-athletes who, of course, deserve the most credit for these achievements, but also all of the coaches and support staff both in our department and across campus who contributed to this year's success and the success in the past.

"The UI's commitment to the academic success of our student-athletes isn't new. It has been a part of our culture for decades and will always remain a high priority. We expect our student-athletes to compete successfully in the classroom while they compete for championships."

Gary Barta,


The NCAA introduced the GSR in 2005 to more accurately assess the academic success of student-athletes. Unlike the federal graduation rate, the GSR holds institutions accountable for transfer student-athletes. The GSR also accounts for midyear enrollees and is calculated for every sport.

"I'm very proud of the work of not only our student-athletes who, of course, deserve the most credit for these achievements, but also all of the coaches and support staff both in our department and across campus who contributed to this year's success and the success in the past," said Gary Barta, the UI's director of athletics.

"The UI's commitment to the academic success of our student-athletes isn't new. It has been a part of our culture for decades and will always remain a high priority. We expect our student-athletes to compete successfully in the classroom while they compete for championships."

The GSR score for 18 of Iowa's 24 sports programs exceeded that of the national average for their peers and, and 21 of Iowa's 24 sports programs scored 80 or better in the GSR. Five teams - women's basketball, field hockey, women's golf, softball and women's tennis - achieved perfect scores of 100.

The UI's baseball program posted the highest GSR - 93 - among Iowa's men's teams for the second straight season. It was followed by men's basketball and men's tennis at 89, men's track and field and cross country at 88, football at 82, and men's gymnastics at 80.

The GSR's for football (82), men's basketball (89), and women's basketball (100) all bested the national averages in their sport: 68, 65, and 86, respectively. In addition:

  • Iowa's women's basketball team scored a perfect 100 on the GSR for the third straight year.
  • Iowa's women's golf team scored a perfect 100 on the GSR for the third straight year.
  • Iowa's field hockey team scored a perfect 100 on the GSR for the second straight year.

    In June, the UI learned that all of 24 of its athletics programs were in excellent standing according to the NCAA's annual "Academic Progress Report." The NCAA calculates an APR each academic year for every Division I sports team. The calculation is based on the eligibility and retention of each scholarship student-athlete over the previous four years. Team scoring below certain thresholds can face sanctions such as losses of scholarships and restrictions on practices.