James Ferentz guards the UI football legacy - Hawkeye Sports Official Athletic Site
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James Ferentz guards the UI football legacy
Senior center has matured into a leader among the 2012 Hawkeyes
University of Iowa senior James Ferentz and the Hawkeyes open the 2012 season Sept. 1 against Northern Illinois in Chicago's Soldier Field.
University of Iowa senior James Ferentz and the Hawkeyes open the 2012 season Sept. 1 against Northern Illinois in Chicago's Soldier Field.
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July 30, 2012

Editor's Note: The following first appeared in the University of Iowa's Hawk Talk Daily, an e-newsletter that offers a daily look at the Iowa Hawkeyes, delivered free each morning to thousands of fans of the Hawkeyes worldwide.

CHICAGO -- The first day new University of Iowa football student-athletes set foot on campus, their photograph is taken by strength and conditioning coach Chris Doyle. When they check out of the Hayden Fry Football Complex four or five years later, they get a peek at their old self.

In all cases, the rookie Hawkeye looks much different from the graduating one. In fact, many of the players cringe or laugh at how their former self looked -- both physically and maturity-wise.

Hawkeye center James Ferentz can attest.

Football Media Day

The son of head coach Kirk Ferentz, James came to the UI after an exceptional career at in-town Iowa City High School. Twice he was named first-team all-state in football, and he finished runner-up at the state wrestling championships as a senior. James said he enjoys playing for his father, and he is putting the finishing touches on his career by making amends for what could be described as growing pains by a much younger James.

"I know I drove him nuts for a while," James said Friday at Big Ten Football Media Days in Chicago. "I'm thankful for the opportunity to play at the University of Iowa, and I'm going to enjoy it as much as possible. I was screwing up on the football field and then I was obviously able to screw up off the football field. I wasn't doing a lot of good things for him, but I'm trying to pay him back now."

Talk about an everlasting Father's Day gift.

A 19-year-old James Ferentz is a skeleton of the 23-year-old James Ferentz. The younger version of James was penalized with suspension from spring ball and community service in 2009 following two college boys will be college boys transgressions; the current version of James is listed on the Rimington Trophy preseason Watch List for a second straight season, and more importantly, he is a repeat selection to the team's Leadership Group.

"That's the process of growing up," said James, an honorable mention All-Big Ten performer as a junior. "You spend a lot of time when you're younger and you're not aware of how selfish you're being with some of the things you do. As you get older, you're able to put more on your plate in a leadership role and try to set an example for the other guys. Around the (football) complex, we talk about being guardians of the legacy: either you're building the tradition, or you're breaking it down."

It's construction time for James these days.





"That's the process of growing up. You spend a lot of time when you're younger and you're not aware of how selfish you're being with some of the things you do. As you get older, you're able to put more on your plate in a leadership role and try to set an example for the other guys. Around the (football) complex, we talk about being guardians of the legacy: either you're building the tradition, or you're breaking it down."
James Ferentz
UI senior center


Listed at 6-foot-2, 284 pounds, Ferentz is a main cog on a Hawkeye offensive line that a year ago was second in the Big Ten for fewest yards penalized, and third in fewest penalties per game. Iowa averaged 372.5 yards of offense and 27.5 points a game in 2011. Ferentz started all 13 games a year ago, as did left tackle Riley Reiff, right guard Adam Gettis and right tackle Markus Zusevics. Reiff, Gettis and Zusevics are now in the NFL.

"We lost some great players, but those guys did the program a huge favor by mentoring these younger guys," Ferentz said. "They left their mark not only on the field, but off the field as well with the role they had in the development of the younger players."

Younger players like Brandon Scherff, Andrew Donnal, Austin Blythe and Jordan Walsh -- all names on the preseason depth chart -- and all underclassmen.

"The two names that jump out are Austin Blythe and Jordan Walsh," Ferentz said. "You're looking at two great guys, two great human beings. Their character is outstanding, and when you put them on the football field -- especially in Hawkeye uniforms...the future looks great."

One way Ferentz guards the Iowa legacy is by mentoring; the same way he was advised in 2008 by then-Hawkeye Rob Bruggeman, now with the Kansas City Chiefs.

"I'll never forget my first year. Rob Bruggeman took me under his wing and showed me how to prepare for a game, how to carry yourself day-to-day if you want to be successful," Ferentz said. "He was a great role model and he is someone I try to be like now that I'm in a position where he was when I came into the program."

Like the rest of the contingent at Big Ten Football Media Days, Ferentz is dashing into a tunnel-vision approach of football 24-7. Fall camp opens Friday -- a time where players become oblivious to external chatter and distractions, and focus on doing things the Hawkeye way.

The Hawkeye way is to build on the tradition, not to break it down; it is taking a raw youngster and giving him the tools to be a talented, successful man down the road.

"It's one of those things you never realize until it's all said and done," Ferentz said.

He was referring to physical growth that will be noticeable by looking at his "before photo" taken as an incoming freshman.

But the Iowa football program builds more than the physicality of its players. The Iowa football program makes the selfish selfless, the immature mature, and the followers leaders.

You don't need to ask James Ferentz for proof. Watching him is evidence enough.

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